Archives: April 2015

WATCH – WIN WIN “Couch Paranoia”

April 22nd, 2015

WINWIN-couchparanoia

The new album by WIN WIN is out now via Arts & Crafts, but there were a couple of singles and videos that were released before the album, that we haven’t posted about until now. Below is the video for “Couch Paranoia,” which was the A side of their lead-up 7″, that featured “Waster” as the B side. Even if you’re already familiar with the track, you’re gonna want to see the video, right?

LISTEN – Fort Knox Five “Pressurize The Cabin”

April 21st, 2015

fortknoxfive-KCRWstream

“Over the years, our nation’s capitol has revealed itself as one of our nation’s capitols of funk music as well! The current leaders of the DC funk scene, the collective known as Fort Knox Five return after the past several years remixing the likes of Donovan, Shawn Lee and Bob Marley with their first full-length album of original, danceable jams since their 2008 debut.” — via KCRW

Click HERE to hear “Pressurize The Cabin” in full, or check out the title track below.

LISTEN – Greg Grease “Born To Lurk, Forced To Work”

April 19th, 2015

greggrease-citypages

“The specter of death lingers in Greg Grease‘s otherwise convivial sophomore full-length, Born to Lurk, Forced to Work. “Originally it was just gonna be a mixtape… but then I started liking some of the songs a lot. It took a life of its own,” says Grease. The concept was simple: the dichotomy of lurking and working, celebrating the nightlife of a young, grimy creative while scorning returning to a job the following morning.” — via City Pages

Check out Rip Van Winkle from “Born To Lurk, Forced To Work” below, or listen to the entire album HERE.

WATCH – Doomtree “Beastface”

April 18th, 2015

doomtree-beastface

DOOMTREE are as formidable a force as their name suggests. Sonically muscular, imposing, the hip hop crew have a rare independence – insisting that the world meet them on their terms, the group fight off the mechanisations of the music industry. New album ‘All Hands’ is a case in point. Dropping on May 4th via their own label, it finds DOOMTREE to continuing to push themselves forward, remaining true to their vision by leaving the past behind. ‘Beastface’ is a way of letting fans know where their heads are at. Relentless from the off, it comes equipped with visuals from Issac Gale.” — via Clash

Check out the video below.

WATCH – Pell’s “Runaway” (LARRY BRRD Remix)

April 17th, 2015

pell-runawayremix

“New Orleans rapper Pell has commissioned an impressive animated video for LA-via-Boston (duh!) producer LARRY BRRD’s lush remix of “Runaway,” a standout off last year’s Floating While Dreaming. Created and edited by Aaron Keuter, it renders the song’s story about a broken home in warm colors befitting of the song’s pop-y reworking. “I wanted to create an animated video that illustrated the most sacred union being broken, and I think we accomplished that,” says Pell. “I’m very inspired by cartoons, and Aaron was able to turn my vision into a masterpiece with his animation.”” — via Fader

Check out the video below!

WATCH – Nowness Premieres Howling’s ‘Signs’

April 17th, 2015

howling-signs

“[Howling’s] new single “Signs” finds Ry [X] reprising another creative outlet: his partnership with German producer Frank Wiedemann, which was the spark in 2012 for the keening underground dance anthem “Howling.” In many ways it’s an incongruous union. Wiedemann—also one half of house duo Âme—was raised in Germany’s capital of technology, Karlsruhe, the birthplace of Karl Benz, who invented the motor car; it’s not a town with too many surfer dudes, but they know a thing or two about structure and programming.” — via Nowness

Watch ‘Signs’ below!

WATCH – Young Fathers ‘Shame’ @ Complex

April 16th, 2015

youngfathers-shame-2

“At first listen, I considered ‘Shame’ as a strong, dance-along pop track but with every repeated listen, the track started to sound more sinister and haunting, but you still wanted to dance along to it,” Cole told Complex over email. “My intent with the video was to create a piece that reflected the poignancy of the lyrics and the intensity of the music – while at the same time bringing conversation and question about perception.” — via Complex